#staircase #newmuseum #newyork #SANAA

#staircase #newmuseum #newyork #SANAA

Down down down down at the #newmuseum #SANAA #architecture #staircase #newyork

Down down down down at the #newmuseum #SANAA #architecture #staircase #newyork

#gotham #city / #Chrysler

#gotham #city / #Chrysler

#newyork #coding. Flecks of #Georgian

#newyork #coding. Flecks of #Georgian

#newyork #typography walking the #highline

#newyork #typography walking the #highline

Inside the #Guggenheim #franklloydwright

Inside the #Guggenheim #franklloydwright

I Stumbled Upon You, Corbu.

writingaboutarchitecture:

This time last year I visited the grave of Master Architect, Le Corbusier. (A very grave moment, indeed)

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I wanted to be moved to the point I would fall to my knees, shedding at least a tear from each eye.

But all that happened was this:

Le Corbusier

Boom! 

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Boooooom!

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BOOM!

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His life’s work flashing-in-quick-succession in my mind’s eye.

Still think about this scorching day trying to find Le Corbusier’s tombstone in a massive cemetery in Roquebrune, South of France.

fuckyeahbrutalism:

Mummers Theater (now Stage Center), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 1970, Demolished 2014
(John M. Johansen)
As demolition proceeds in earnest on this understudied monument to architect John Johansen’s inimitable creativity, I’ll dedicate the next few days to photographs of his doomed masterpiece. Unfortunately, there’s nothing we can do now but look back with respect and admiration. 

Another one bites the dust

fuckyeahbrutalism:

Mummers Theater (now Stage Center), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 1970, Demolished 2014

(John M. Johansen)

As demolition proceeds in earnest on this understudied monument to architect John Johansen’s inimitable creativity, I’ll dedicate the next few days to photographs of his doomed masterpiece. Unfortunately, there’s nothing we can do now but look back with respect and admiration. 

Another one bites the dust

Bompas & Parr

Harry Bompas from Bompas & Parr came to work yesterday to talk about the studio’s work, and to feed us architectural jelly.

This mould (above) is used to create St. Paul’s-shaped jelly structures (below).

Founded by Sam Bompas and Harry Parr (a Bartlett School graduate) in 2007, the pair began their gastronomic practice by making jelly structures to titillate the senses with unusual flavours.

Other projects include this shop window display for Selfridges, a miniature city made of gingerbread.

Bompas & Parr create flavour based experiences with architectural installations and contemporary food design.

(Chromatopsia, 2013, turned the River Lea green)

Exploring the relationship between food and architecture, their work is certainly playful, oscillating between the realms of whimsy and the downright outlandish.

The fine line between beauty and eyesore

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Alexandra Road Estate is beautiful in its clever use of indoor and outdoor space, light and access routes. Its vast grey concrete mass was bound to cause waves. 

And cause waves it has - and still does.

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Concrete is the Marmite of the built environment. These flats are highly desirable and are sold for a whole lotta coin, yet are deemed unappealing to buyers in the eyes of lenders, which means THEY ARE BOUGHT STRAIGHT UP WITH ££££££££££££££££££££££££

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Designed in 1968 by modernist architect Neave Brown and located a stone’s throw away from that Abbey Road crossing (made famous when the Beatles traversed its zebra), the estate announces its presence in NW in its sombre horizontality, rising up to four floors. 

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Mostly occupied by council tenants, who can buy their homes from the local authority after 10-year residency, privately-owned flats are selling for bucket loads, especially considering lenders are not providing mortgages on the estate. WHY WOULD THEY DO THAT?

Because it is (wrongly) deemed to be an unattractive place to live due to its - yep, you guessed it - concrete!

I visited these two flats when they were on the market, and this is what I found:

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This two-bed was bought by an architect seven years ago. With his wife, he raised two small children here (the eldest of which he named Neave), before deciding to move to the ‘burbs.

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Sensitively restored and maintained, the architect preserved many original features, such as the internal moveable partitions and the timber stairs, adding LEDS under the treads.

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Stencilled in multicoloured lettering beneath a light switch by the front entrance reads “HOUSE OF FUN” - a nice touch.image

On the market for £375K, the property was snapped up by a dogged buyer, and sure lover of concrete, for ‘significantly above asking price’.

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Clearly, lenders have got it all wrong.

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This flat (below) is on the market for £275K, a one-bed close to the railway line. It was bought three months ago by the current owner for £80K less… Mental, eh.

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Just mental.

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Note the kitchen’s original sliding cabinet doors and brown tiling.

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Although only 500 sq ft, the flat felt bigger due to large glazing, opening out onto a south-facing balcony.

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Oooh, say what, say what, say what?